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Help with carpentry questions

  1. #26
    Backwoods lobster boy number9's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions


    Quote Originally Posted by JettaJayGLS View Post
    Lets say you have a board that is 48 inches wide, and you want to cut it down to 36 inches. If you set the fence at 12 inches, you are left with 36 inches on the other. This isn't exactly true. Normally, the width of the blade is compensated for, so your 12 inch side will be 12 inches, but your 36 inch side will be slightly shorter due to the width of the blade. The blade should be ~1/8th inch thick. So you are left with a clean 12 inch side and the other side is 35 7/8.

    To compensate, set the fence at 11 7/8. That will leave you with two pieces: one 11 & 7/8 and the other 36 inches.
    Will this trick work if I need to cut a bevel at the same time? I feel like the angle of the bevel will be off by 180 degrees.

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  2. #27
    Fast is contagious JettaJayGLS's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by number9 View Post
    Will this trick work if I need to cut a bevel at the same time? I feel like the angle of the bevel will be off by 180 degrees.
    I don't see why not, but you gotta think it through. Even if I thought it through and typed it out, it would be nearly impossible for you to comprehend.
    I don't see any reason it would work. I imagine your table saw is like mine and the blade only angles one direction. Depending whether its an outside or inside corner, you will need to flip the board on its front or back side (IE, the side that goes against the wall or the side that you see).

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  3. #28
    Backwoods lobster boy number9's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by JettaJayGLS View Post
    I don't see why not, but you gotta think it through. Even if I thought it through and typed it out, it would be nearly impossible for you to comprehend.
    I don't see any reason it would work. I imagine your table saw is like mine and the blade only angles one direction. Depending whether its an outside or inside corner, you will need to flip the board on its front or back side (IE, the side that goes against the wall or the side that you see).
    I am dumb as shit. I just need to flip the board on its back.. thanks! That should work perfectly

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  4. #29
    Fast is contagious JettaJayGLS's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    No worries. And to clarify my previous post: "I don't see any reason it wouldn't work."
    And I didn't mean to imply you couldn't figure it out when I said "it would be nearly impossible for you to comprehend." It would just be an incredibly wordy response that would be impossible for anyone to interpret.

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  5. #30
    Angry Gumball RandyO's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    use a piece of corner molding for outside corners, gives you up to a half inch of tolerance

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  6. #31
    Backwoods lobster boy number9's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by JettaJayGLS View Post
    No worries. And to clarify my previous post: "I don't see any reason it wouldn't work."
    And I didn't mean to imply you couldn't figure it out when I said "it would be nearly impossible for you to comprehend." It would just be an incredibly wordy response that would be impossible for anyone to interpret.
    All good, that's how I interpreted what you said!

    Quote Originally Posted by RandyO View Post
    use a piece of corner molding for outside corners, gives you up to a half inch of tolerance
    What type of molding would you suggest here?

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  7. #32
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    I just finished recessed panel wainscoting in my dining room and here's my advice. I didn't use bead board but I used a 1/4 inch plywood backer that put me in the same situation as you with the bead board.

    First go down to Lowes and get a Bora saw guide for ripping the bead board. I cannot express how valuable this is for cutting large pieces. It's a straight edge with an adjustable clamping mechanism built in. It comes in different lengths and the shorter one is a lot easier to handle. If you are not ripping pieces over 48" then go with the shorter option. They also make saw attachments which fit into the grooves of this guide but it's not necessary. Just keep the saw against the guide and you'll get a straight cut. You'll need something under it (plywood or something rigid) to prevent the bead board from bowing when the guide is clamped in place.

    https://boratool.com/bora-ngx-100-clamp-edge-saw-guide

    I highly recommend using 4x8 sheets of bead board to limit the seams as much as possible. With the guide above, you will be able to rip 4x8 sheets down to the width you need and have a long piece of stock to work with. If you follow the steps below, your cuts won't have to be perfect as they will be hidden by the base board on the bottom and the molding under the top cap.

    Take the base board off and run the bead board all the way to the floor, then install new (or reuse the existing) baseboard on top of the bead board (cope the inside corners on the new baseboard). This will help hold the bead board in place and make for a clean look where the baseboard and bead board meet. It also means you don't have to worry about making a perfectly clean cut since it will be hidden by the base board. If you just run the bead board with a seam along the top of the base board it will eventually separate where the two meet and look really bad. Sure, glue could help, but running the base board on top of the bead board is a much better approach. It will look cleaner and it can't separate since you're essentially clamping the bottom of the bead board to the wall by doing this.

    If the floor is wavy just let the base board run across it and caulk the gap before you paint it. You could scribe it but it would be a lot more work and no one is going to see it if you fill it in with some caulk and paint over it.

    You can use quarter round for the inside corners. Here again you'll want to install it on top of the bead board to hide any seams and clamp it in place.

    Now for the top cap. I would rip a piece of 1x down on your table saw to a suitable width to fit the profile you're looking for (likely somewhere between 1 and 1 1/4 inches). This should be placed above the bead board, not against it. Miter and glue the corners, and make sure you nail it into the studs (use a stud finder). Once installed, sand the edges by hand with 220 grit sand paper to round them off slightly. This will help them take the paint better.

    Next run a piece of molding under the top cap where it meets the bead board to cover this seam and add a decorative touch. Doing this will clamp the top of the bead board to the wall and hide the seam where the top of the bead board runs along the bottom of the top cap. The molding you choose will determine the width of the top cap (I personally prefer cove molding which is shown in the pic you posted, but there are many options). I always like the top cap to be slightly wider than the molding but not so much that it hides the contour of the molding beneath it. Since the molding will be on top of the bead board, make sure you consider the thickness of the bead board along with the molding when determining your top cap width.

    Between the glue holding the bead board to the wall, the base board holding it on the bottom, and the molding under the top cap on the top, things will be clamped on all sides and stay that way for years to come. All of your horizontal seams will be hidden so the lines will be clean. The vertical seams in the middle where the different sections of bead board meet will be a challenge but I would just try to keep them in line with the other grooves in the bead board to help them blend in. Again, using the 4x8 sheets will help here.

    It's very important you do this correctly so that things don't come apart over time. Sure it may look great when you're done but the issue is how it will look in a few years after the wood has contracted and things start opening up. If you do it the way I've described above, it will hold up well. The general rule is hide your seems with molding and any open seems (where the bead board joins) should be minimized as much as possible (i.e. using 4x8 sheets to get longer lengths).

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    Last edited by BSR6; Yesterday at 09:06 AM.

  8. #33
    Lifer golden chicken's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    A neat trick is to take your piece of material you intend to use as a saw guide and secure it to a board of 1/4" plywood. Then take your circ saw and rip the board using the guide. Now you just put the edge of the board where you want your cut (mind the kerf), clamp it and cut. No extra math to always subtract the width of the circ saw shoe from your measurements.

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  9. #34
    Lifer BSR6's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Also, you might want to get a miter saw. If you're on a budget then don't go crazy. You can get a smaller saw that would still work for this project for $150. I find the smaller saws to actually be a tad more accurate since the blade doesn't deflect as much. It's a tool worth owning for future projects. It will make molding projects a piece of cake and give you professional results.

    Tools are a huge factor. I've learned the hard way over the years that having good tools makes things go faster and you get MUCH better results. Saws are particularly critical and you can do just about anything if you have a good portable table saw, miter saw, and a circular saw.

    For this project, you may not even need the table saw. The guide I posted will be sufficient for ripping board with a circular saw and the miter saw will be critical for the molding.

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    Last edited by BSR6; Yesterday at 09:13 AM.

  10. #35
    Awesomeness, Inc. MattR302's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Remember, caulking and paint make you the carpenter you ain’t.

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  11. #36
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by BSR6 View Post
    Also, you might want to get a miter saw. If you're on a budget then don't go crazy. You can get a smaller saw that would still work for this project for $150. I find the smaller saws to actually be a tad more accurate since the blade doesn't deflect as much. It's a tool worth owning for future projects. It will make molding projects a piece of cake and give you professional results.

    Tools are a huge factor. I've learned the hard way over the years that having good tools makes things go faster and you get MUCH better results. Saws are particularly critical and you can do just about anything if you have a good portable table saw, miter saw, and a circular saw.

    For this project, you may not even need the table saw. The guide I posted will be sufficient for ripping board with a circular saw and the miter saw will be critical for the molding.
    I prefer table saw with a sled for these types of cuts. I find it more accurate than the low end Dewalt miter saw I have. Honestly, I only use the miter saw for non-finish pieces. It just isn't accurate. I'd like to replace it. Maybe with a better miter saw I would have a different tune.
    I guess I'm saying....unless you buy a higher end miter saw, stick with the table saw.
    But buy all the tools. Ebay/craigslist is great for getting chunks of used stuff in one go.

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  12. #37
    Angry Gumball RandyO's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by number9 View Post
    All good, that's how I interpreted what you said!

    What type of molding would you suggest here?
    something like this

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Royal-Mo...8002/100048741


    but real wood

    edit: found some

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Woodgrai...1949/203898781

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    Last edited by RandyO; Yesterday at 09:52 AM.
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  13. #38
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by JettaJayGLS View Post
    I prefer table saw with a sled for these types of cuts. I find it more accurate than the low end Dewalt miter saw I have. Honestly, I only use the miter saw for non-finish pieces. It just isn't accurate. I'd like to replace it. Maybe with a better miter saw I would have a different tune.
    I guess I'm saying....unless you buy a higher end miter saw, stick with the table saw.
    But buy all the tools. Ebay/craigslist is great for getting chunks of used stuff in one go.
    I never had much for woodworking tools till last spring when I started my workbench project, and since, I have spent probably $3k in power & hand tools, clamps, straight edges, squares, mallets, chisels, nice hand saw, extra Ryobi +1 batteries, etc.

    I am also going to refurbish my old AMF era Dewalt radial arm saw, apparently it's a classic that they don't build em that way anymore because people are using compound miter saws now days

    I wanna get a planner

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  14. #39
    Fast is contagious JettaJayGLS's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    I should have bought a planer...one of those that I didn't follow my motto of "just buy it" and regret it.

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  15. #40
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Ha. I've also been on the hunt for a radial arm saw. I'll probably just get a sears saw like my dad had in the 80's. They seem to still be going. Purists say you need a cast Dewalt with the adjustment cranks on the back of the arm. But I think the crapsman is good 'nuf for me. I was really surprised what a cult following vintage radial arm saws have.

    In my case I want it just to have my dado set installed full-time. I will continue to cross cut with a miter saw and rip cut with a table or track saw.
    Although I'll agree with Jay about the cross cut table saw sled. Building one of those has changed my life for precision cuts.

    Regarding tool hoarding, I mean collecting. I once read this series of articles about building a wood shop from scratch, one pay-check at a time. The series can be kind of hard to follow. But I think the advice is pretty spot on. To topic, the first tool they suggest you buy is a circular saw with a couple of decent blades. Then a sheet of plywood to build an edge-guide for cross and rip-cutting sheet goods. They don't have you buying a table-saw until installment 10! I think that is solid advice.


    Quote Originally Posted by MattR302 View Post
    Remember, caulking and paint make you the carpenter you ain’t.
    THIS! This is the expression I was looking for but couldn't remember the other night.
    This is me to a T. Buy caulk by the case.

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  16. #41
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    I think your issue may be the saw you're using. A good miter saw is well worth it and far better than a table saw with a sled. Sure, you can use at table saw, but it's a lot more effort and an accurate miter saw makes these kinds of cuts effortless.

    I have a high end Dewalt with the light over the blade that casts a shadow where the blade will cut. The cuts were so precise on the recessed wainscoting I did, the painters hardly used any caulk. They only ran a bead along where the top cap meets the wall and that's it. They were super impressed and I owe it all to the saw.

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  17. #42
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by nhbubba View Post
    . Purists say you need a cast Dewalt with the adjustment cranks on the back of the arm.
    that is the on I have, mfg in 1954, did not realize the value of what I have until recently, I bought it from my x brother in law 35 years ago for $100 when he bought a new Craftsman that is nowhere near as good, I have a few missing pieces, and I wanna replace the brushes in the motor

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  18. #43
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by nhbubba View Post
    Then a sheet of plywood to build an edge-guide for cross and rip-cutting sheet goods. They don't have you buying a table-saw until installment 10! I think that is solid advice.




    THIS! This is the expression I was looking for but couldn't remember the other night.
    This is me to a T. Buy caulk by the case.
    these days, a real straight edge is cheaper than a sheet of plywood

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/Swanson-Too...-Ruler/1006469

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    Last edited by RandyO; Yesterday at 10:45 AM.
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  19. #44
    Burns retinas nhbubba's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Value seems hugely subjective. Find the right buyer and supposedly they are worth money. In reality I see a lot advertised for maybe $100. Which IMO is what they are really worth.
    Mind you I am talking the smaller 110v/10" units. Not the heavy duty production 220v or higher units that drive larger blades.

    Is the arbor on that >70 year old saw standard? Any trouble getting blades for it?

    I am trying to build up the guts to scrap an otherwise nice old cast-iron table saw that belonged to my grandfather partly because it wouldn't take a full 10" blade and had a weird arbor diameter. At one point I had to 3d print a bushing to use a modern blade. I replaced it with a new Rigid brand hybrid contractor/cabinet saw that is the balls. Takes every blade I've thrown at it, including my dado stack. And it is amazing to have a fence you don't have to re-align every time you move it!

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  20. #45
    Angry Gumball RandyO's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    mine takes the exact same 12" blades as my sons 15 yr old miter saw (5/8 arbor), the motor can be wired for 110 or 220, currently, it's wired for 110, but when I refurbish it, I will likely rewire to 220

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  21. #46
    Angry Gumball RandyO's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Quote Originally Posted by nhbubba View Post
    Value seems hugely subjective.
    the value I never knew it had, was the support and old parts you can still find, the following so to speak, there are more old Dewalt youtube videos than I ever thought, ideas for modifications, how to repair/rebuilt, different uses and attachments, almost as versatile as a Shop Smith

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  22. #47
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    This may not be helpful and is surely more expensive, but when I remodeled my bathroom I used a system like this: https://www.lowes.com/pd/10-36-sq-ft...Kit/1000444077

    The panels and moldings overlap so there arenít any noticeable seams. I was also happy with it being PVC in the bathroom so it doesnít shrink or swell. Just another option, but if youíre doing a large area I imagine the cost could get prohibitive quickly.

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  23. #48
    Backwoods lobster boy number9's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    In terms of joining seams on long walls, am I better off using two factory seams (likely to be on a flat part of the board) or cutting the board myself in the valley of the pattern?

    Quote Originally Posted by BSR6 View Post
    Also, you might want to get a miter saw. If you're on a budget then don't go crazy. You can get a smaller saw that would still work for this project for $150. I find the smaller saws to actually be a tad more accurate since the blade doesn't deflect as much. It's a tool worth owning for future projects. It will make molding projects a piece of cake and give you professional results.

    Tools are a huge factor. I've learned the hard way over the years that having good tools makes things go faster and you get MUCH better results. Saws are particularly critical and you can do just about anything if you have a good portable table saw, miter saw, and a circular saw.

    For this project, you may not even need the table saw. The guide I posted will be sufficient for ripping board with a circular saw and the miter saw will be critical for the molding.
    I've already got the table saw, and I've made a bunch of cuts with it so I can't return it. Or the expensive new blade

    For cutting the molding itself, should I get a miter saw or can I get good results with a table saw & a sled?

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  24. #49
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    I use my compound miter saw a real lot for trim work, I can’t imagine trying to do that with a table saw or circular saw. Especially when it comes to miters - walls are never perfectly 90 degrees - two 45 degree cuts might not mate up nicely. So I’ll do some test cuts with scrap pieces, might find that two 43.5 degree cuts looks perfect. Especially helpful doing trim work around stairs where there’s weird angles. Get your miter angles lined up nicely first, then trim the other end to the length needed.

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  25. #50
    Burns retinas nhbubba's Avatar
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    Re: Help with carpentry questions

    Cross cutting long material (ie molding) on a table saw and a sled isn't going to be any fun.
    IMO you are better off with a chop/miter saw if you have the budget. If not a handheld circular saw with a DIY guide or even a speed-square would work. Again, the better the blade the better the cut will be.

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