Welcome to NESR! Most features of this site require registration, including replying to threads, sending private messages, starting new threads, and uploading files. Click here to register.

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 163

Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

  1. #1
    Lifer Tekime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Falmouth, ME
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,336

    Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry


    Every time I read one of these articles I can't help but think they've got it all backwards. I understand appealing to millenials and hipsters with low-cost, old school looking bikes to an extent, but at what point are they just gutting the spirit of motorcycling? I didn't start riding until I was an adult, but I fell in love at a young age, probably because I saw an ad for a GSX-R and it blew my mind.

    The Motorcycle Industry Is Dying - Bloomberg

    This is hardly a well-thought-out argument, just a random rant. Based on sales I'm not convinced millenials are saving anything. In any case, it's sad to see the motorcycle industry so flat, and I wish every day that fast bikes were a bigger part of the culture in the US. It might help if races were more accessible for fans.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    05GSXR75005SV65090DR350

  2. #2
    Senior Member AEG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Simsbury, CT
    Posts
    627

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    It would help if the general public would be more acceptable to motorcycles like Europe

    4 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  3. #3
    Burns retinas nhbubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Seacoast NH
    Posts
    17,079

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    I think another obstacle in the US is the cost of health care. We, as a society, are scaring ourselves into being too afraid of getting injured to ride. The simple fact is for most younger riders a fall with even a non-life altering injury can cost them tens of thousands of dollars and legitimately wipe them out. I've heard this from younger people a number of times lately. Especially the younger, fresh out of school and not fully employed ones.

    5 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  4. #4
    Lifer
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bristol County
    Age
    33
    Posts
    3,392

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Next week's article: Hipsters are ruining classic motorcycles by hacking them up. Speaking of dying industries, I wonder what the demographics look like for new subscribers.

    "Harley-Davidson, meanwhile, has a new marketing tagline: Nine bikes for under $12,000. Prakash, the marketing chief, breaks it down to $6 a day. Skip the latte; buy a bike." --- That's $6*365*5=$10.9k, not including gear, training, insurance, and any upkeep costs. If they're honest, it's more like $7-8/day, every day, for the next five years, and assuming 0% interest.

    "A motorcycle is a picture of discretionary spending, and they can be tricky to finance even in a healthy credit market. Even now, with the stock market on a historic bull run and after the U.S. auto industry posted its best year on record, traffic in motorcycle stores has stayed slow." Maybe they should check the data on 'discretionary spending' of the millennial demographic and contrast it to 10, 20, 30 years ago. Clearly there's people in that age bracket who have money to spend on toys visiting here, but I think on average that isn't the case. Seems like they're focusing on new sales - I wonder what the used sale numbers look like?

    Maybe it's misdirected, angsty-teenager whining, but these kinda articles fill me with rage that spirals in 10 different directions.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    nedirtriders.com

  5. #5
    Your Father csmutty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Pomfret Center, CT
    Age
    29
    Posts
    10,929

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by nhbubba View Post
    I think another obstacle in the US is the cost of health care. We, as a society, are scaring ourselves into being too afraid of getting injured to ride. The simple fact is for most younger riders a fall with even a non-life altering injury can cost them tens of thousands of dollars and legitimately wipe them out. I've heard this from younger people a number of times lately. Especially the younger, fresh out of school and not fully employed ones.
    Honestly that's been a big thought of mine lately.

    It's drastically changed the way I ride both on the track and on the street.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    -Christian LRRS/CCS HasBeen ECK Racing
    2011 Pit Bike Race CHAMPION!

  6. #6
    Lifer a13x's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    6,588

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    The Born Free motorcycle show happened last week in Socal and it is PAAAAAAACKED with Millennial hipsters on Easy Rider Harley's and old CB's. It ain't my cup of tea but I do like seeing lots of people into bikes.

    Motorcycle industry forever ignored the entry-level category and now (combined with 2008) it's coming around. Remember when your only options for a entry-level sport bike were the 'pretty ugly and uncool' EX250 and EX500, the ones with the 1985 styling? Times were good though and people were buying bikes left and right with the 600cc and 1000cc arms races well underway, so who cares! Now those bikes have stagnated, are very expensive, and intimidating.

    Finally we have awesome entry level bikes. Here is socal I see more R3's, CBR300's, Ninja 300's and RC390's on the street than I do 600+'s. That's not a bad thing. Get people in at a good price on a bike that looks pretty cool and works, get them hooked and then they are in for the long haul.

    This isn't a one or the other topic though. Many factors are at play and all add up.

    1) Kids have different interests. Growing up now you aren't forced outside all day and your priorities have shifted. Recently a co-worker was saying how he offered his daughter the choice of a new iPhone for her 16th BDAY or a car. She chose the iPhone. "Why do I need a car, I'll just Uber"

    2) Products are so good they don't require frequent updates. I'm seeing this across many industries. Snowboarding, bicycles, motorcycles, etc. For the average person, you can have a 10 year old product that's 'pretty friggin awesome' still tech/capabilities-wise. 20 years ago the difference between 10 year life cycle of products was massive. Now, not so much. This leads to lack of buying brand new. You can buy a 2007 Yamaha R6 and 99.5% of the people will go just as fast just as easily as they would on a 2017 Yamaha R6.

    3) Lack of entry level options (see above) and entry price points. Ponying up 12k for a bike then another 5k for gear.... for a hobby you aren't sure about...

    etc etc.

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Boston --> San Diego

  7. #7
    Senior Member TwelveGaugeSage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Palmer, MA
    Posts
    466

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by nhbubba View Post
    I think another obstacle in the US is the cost of health care. We, as a society, are scaring ourselves into being too afraid of getting injured to ride. The simple fact is for most younger riders a fall with even a non-life altering injury can cost them tens of thousands of dollars and legitimately wipe them out. I've heard this from younger people a number of times lately. Especially the younger, fresh out of school and not fully employed ones.
    I have no doubt this is a big part of it. Fortunately, I am covered by the VA for healthcare and a small portion of my income. The bigger hit for me would be the lack of income from my job for months of recovery, especially with my wife not working. I'm in position where at worst(financially) it would delay my retirement, so I don't worry much about it. When I was younger, the thought of huge medical bills was terrifying. So many times I avoided going to the doctor for serious problems. Despite its faults, I wouldn't trade my VA healthcare for any private healthcare, though my family is covered by a pretty good union plan also.

    Another thing I have noticed is people burning out due to cost or scaring themselves. A beginner can surely jump right on a 600 4-cylinder and ride with no problems. But it doesn't take much for that insanely fast little bike to scare them right out of the sport. Not only that, but for a young rider, those bikes tend to be expensive to insure. We need to encourage beginners to start small and learn the basics before moving on to the high powered bikes that most young riders will be craving right out of the gate. I think the current crop of 250-500cc bikes are perfect to learn on without getting boring.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  8. #8
    Senior Member TwelveGaugeSage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Palmer, MA
    Posts
    466

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    The community and the manufacturers should also be pushing for free MSF basic rider course and licensing for those who complete it. That is how I got my license in PA years ago. You tend to draw a lot more people to try it when you eliminate a lot of the high initial costs. In MA, the cost of a BRC is ridiculous. $350+ is stupid.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  9. #9
    Lifer Imbeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Southwick,MA
    Posts
    2,365

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Once gas hits $5 a gallon, bikes will be selling like hot cakes.

    Even with cheap gas, I'm doing my personal best to boost used bike transactions (LOL)

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  10. #10
    Lifer
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,160

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    The ex250 is ugly and uncool?

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  11. #11
    Senior Member TwelveGaugeSage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Palmer, MA
    Posts
    466

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by Gixxer View Post
    The ex250 is ugly and uncool?
    Don't listen to the naysayers. I liked the "sport touring" look and seat of the EX 250 way more than the sportier later iterations. But give me the modern engines any day.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  12. #12
    Burns retinas nhbubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Seacoast NH
    Posts
    17,079

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by Imbeek View Post
    Once gas hits $5 a gallon, bikes will be selling like hot cakes.
    I think that'll drive electric vehicle sales FAR harder than motorcycle sales. Especially here in the land of the snow.

    We all should know well; motorcycles are not cheap transportation here in the US. Possibly never have been.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  13. #13
    Lifer
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bristol County
    Age
    33
    Posts
    3,392

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by TwelveGaugeSage View Post
    The community and the manufacturers should also be pushing for free MSF basic rider course and licensing for those who complete it. That is how I got my license in PA years ago. You tend to draw a lot more people to try it when you eliminate a lot of the high initial costs. In MA, the cost of a BRC is ridiculous. $350+ is stupid.
    The cost seems reasonable when you consider what it involves. Bikes, storage and maintenance for them, training locations, administrative costs, and staff for 2 days.

    What you're really advocating for is subsidizing the cost either through taxes or sponsorship from the manufactures. I believe Harley recently created their own class to do just that, but I'm not sure if it counts for states or insurers who expect an MSF course. The manufactures could (should?) all band together to fund it collectively. It's universally in their interests.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    nedirtriders.com

  14. #14
    Lifer
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bristol County
    Age
    33
    Posts
    3,392

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by nhbubba View Post
    I think that'll drive electric vehicle sales FAR harder than motorcycle sales. Especially here in the land of the snow.

    We all should know well; motorcycles are not cheap transportation here in the US. Possibly never have been.
    Another factor is that people often need a place to store their bike half the year. Cue articles about how less and less millennial are buying houses.

    Edit: I've tried to convince friends to buy bikes, and they just roll their eyes at this point. I told them I won't stop They have zero interest. They drive boring cars, and see it as a waste of time. There is zero enthusiasm. Robo-cars can't come soon enough for some of them. The ones with hints of enthusiasm struggle with the practicality aspects. Perception of them being murdercycles doesn't help either.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Last edited by aldend123; 07-06-17 at 02:05 PM.
    nedirtriders.com

  15. #15
    Lifer ilikenapalm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,861

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    At 28, I don't know if I'm a millennial, but I do know I love going 170.

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  16. #16
    Lifer BSR6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,058

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    I just sat through a 2 hour presentation on research regarding the millennial as a consumer. It's one of many I have sat through and all have been from different sources. While they are all worded differently, they all draw the same conclusions.

    Millennials don't have a genuine interest in anything. They are all about status and "stories" as everyone seems to word it. I am in the wine and spirits business and study after study shows they care most about trying something new and sharing/telling everyone about it. It's about showing up with something that looks sophisticated and no one else has tried. Further re-enforcing this lack of genuine interest is the fact that they are heavily influenced by external sources (as opposed to their own preferences). Marketing has a tremendous impact on them. Product image reigns above all. They also seem to live rather "safe" lifestyles. Not only are they safe in terms of avoiding risky behavior, but they are safe in the sense that everything they do revolves around limiting consequences. They are all about rules and following them. From social etiquette to fashion trends. This is where we get into the overly sensitive, politically correct stereotype.

    I think motorcycles are for people who are looking for a genuine experience. It's something that you do because you truly love the feeling of riding a motorcycle. You don't do it to impress your friends. There's too much risk and personal responsibility required.

    In short...Based on the consumer trends of millennials, motorcycles are on the far end of the spectrum from anything that would interest them.

    3 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  17. #17
    Lifer Garandman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Dorchester, MA / Mt Sunapee, NH
    Posts
    11,107

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Sure are a lot of flat black helmets, Ducati Monsters and Triumph Bonnevilles in Boston these days, you sure Millenials aren't buying in?

    Motorcycling really took off in the late 60's, guess compared to being drafted for Vietnam it was safe. Guy I bought my first bike from is stil riding as well, 38 years.

    California biker profile? Old, male, married and moneyed - LA Times

    32 Compelling Motorcycle Demographics | BrandonGaille.com

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    If you get a thumbs down from me, pm me, it was inadvertent

  18. #18
    Senior Member TwelveGaugeSage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Palmer, MA
    Posts
    466

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by aldend123 View Post
    The cost seems reasonable when you consider what it involves. Bikes, storage and maintenance for them, training locations, administrative costs, and staff for 2 days.

    What you're really advocating for is subsidizing the cost either through taxes or sponsorship from the manufactures. I believe Harley recently created their own class to do just that, but I'm not sure if it counts for states or insurers who expect an MSF course. The manufactures could (should?) all band together to fund it collectively. It's universally in their interests.
    Exactly what I am saying. The price is fair from a cost perspective, but from the perspective of a young adult who thinks he MIGHT like riding a motorcycle, it's a bit much. It seems like something that the riding community, manufacturers, insurance companies, and even the governmental safety Nazis could get behind. It seems to work great for PA. I believe all military members need the course to ride on base now.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  19. #19
    Lifer markbvt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Georgia, VT
    Posts
    3,738

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    I've seen this sort of thing come up pretty frequently; the OEMs seem to do a lot of hand-wringing about their inability to sell a lot of bikes to millennials, and industry analysts love to go on about how motorcycling is in decline because millennials aren't buying bikes.

    It's bullshit though. I know a lot of millennials who ride -- but the thing they all have in common is that (at least until they hit their late 20s) they're not interested in buying new bikes because the value proposition is not there. Three of my millennial friends finally bought new bikes in the past couple of years after owning a variety of used ones through their 20s, because all three of them were finally in stable enough financial positions for it to make sense.

    Frankly, the OEMs would do better to concentrate on building exciting bikes targeted at Gen X and the older millennials. Triumph, KTM, and Ducati, for example, have done a great job growing their sales without putting out low-end bikes catering to entry-level riders.

    --mark

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    '17 KTM 1090 Adventure R / '16 Honda Africa Twin (for sale) / '11 Triumph Tiger 800 XC / '03 Honda XR650L (for sale) / '01 Triumph Bonneville cafe
    My ride reports: Missile silos, Labrador, twisties, and more
    Bennington Triumph Bash, June 1-3, 2018

  20. #20
    Lifer
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bristol County
    Age
    33
    Posts
    3,392

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by BSR6 View Post
    I just sat through a 2 hour presentation on research regarding the millennial as a consumer. It's one of many I have sat through and all have been from different sources. While they are all worded differently, they all draw the same conclusions.

    Millennials don't have a genuine interest in anything. They are all about status and "stories" as everyone seems to word it. I am in the wine and spirits business and study after study shows they care most about trying something new and sharing/telling everyone about it. It's about showing up with something that looks sophisticated and no one else has tried. Further re-enforcing this lack of genuine interest is the fact that they are heavily influenced by external sources (as opposed to their own preferences). Marketing has a tremendous impact on them. Product image reigns above all. They also seem to live rather "safe" lifestyles. Not only are they safe in terms of avoiding risky behavior, but they are safe in the sense that everything they do revolves around limiting consequences. They are all about rules and following them. From social etiquette to fashion trends. This is where we get into the overly sensitive, politically correct stereotype.

    I think motorcycles are for people who are looking for a genuine experience. It's something that you do because you truly love the feeling of riding a motorcycle. You don't do it to impress your friends. There's too much risk and personal responsibility required.

    In short...Based on the consumer trends of millennials, motorcycles are on the far end of the spectrum from anything that would interest them.
    Hasn't your field always been about the social aspect, the stories, and some status? Maybe what's a little different is a shift towards interest in perceived boutique/craft/artisan over mass consumer products? Marketing has a tremendous impact on millennials, yet the superbowl has been famous for at least two decades or more for their advertising. Study after study - of social media? So those who pursue vanity are possibly over represented?

    Historically motorcycles have been a surefire way to buy a disingenuous image. It's a genuine experience to many of us here, but for some it's a garage piece. A sticker for the back window of the truck or a t-shirt to wear at social functions. And it isn't just Harley. The Fox logo sells a lifestyle too. Or a perfectly clean white Dainese jacket and a full face with a spotless shield to carry in to the bar. A supersport that looks cool standing still to pose next to on the street corner or to snap stories of. All of it gets used a couple summer nights a year.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    nedirtriders.com

  21. #21
    Lifer Chippertheripper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    the fairest of havens
    Age
    41
    Posts
    13,982

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    I blame the helicopter parent for millennial not riding bikes, if we're going to generalize.
    Because somebody asked above, I think 36 is the current cutoff for millennials. so if you're younger than that, you are one.

    I'm going to be over here doing my thing. This is really a fascinating thread to read, there's some good insight into something I'd have literally never have thought of otherwise.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Cliff's Cycles KTM
    NETRA enduro B-vet
    Close your eyes, look deep in your soul, step outside yourself and let your mind go.

  22. #22
    Senior Member TwelveGaugeSage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Palmer, MA
    Posts
    466

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    I turn 36 this year and have always been between Gen-X and millennials. I don't really fit into either group broadly or otherwise. I find I relate much more with my 50 year-old coworkers than I do the 20-30 year old reservists we work with. These generational generalizations always seemed a bit goofy to me.

    2 Not allowed! Not allowed!

  23. #23
    Member TB151's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Windham, NH
    Posts
    84

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by TwelveGaugeSage View Post
    I turn 36 this year and have always been between Gen-X and millennials. I don't really fit into either group broadly or otherwise. I find I relate much more with my 50 year-old coworkers than I do the 20-30 year old reservists we work with. These generational generalizations always seemed a bit goofy to me.
    Recently turned 38 and in the same boat. The new term for us is Xennials.Finally we have a home

    Xennials, The Microgeneration Between Gen X And Millennials

    4 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    #529 Amateur 2007 Triumph Daytona 675
    2015 BMW S1000RR

  24. #24
    Super Adventurer SRTie4k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dublin, NH
    Age
    36
    Posts
    4,952

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by BSR6 View Post
    I think motorcycles are for people who are looking for a genuine experience. It's something that you do because you truly love the feeling of riding a motorcycle. You don't do it to impress your friends. There's too much risk and personal responsibility required.
    Harley, it's image and it's riders are almost entirely about "impressing your friends". Given that Harley owns over half the motorcycle market, it seems to me that image is almost entirely what sells motorcycles.

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    2015 KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    2017 Honda CRF250L Rally

  25. #25
    Super Adventurer SRTie4k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dublin, NH
    Age
    36
    Posts
    4,952

    Re: Millenials and the so-called dying motorcycle industry

    Quote Originally Posted by TB151 View Post
    Recently turned 38 and in the same boat. The new term for us is Xennials.Finally we have a home

    Xennials, The Microgeneration Between Gen X And Millennials
    At 33, I'm pretty sure I fall into this category as well. I relate more closely with the Gen Xers than I do millenials.

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    2015 KTM 1290 Super Adventure
    2017 Honda CRF250L Rally

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •